Tweet4Trees part deux…Like4Trees

Three years ago we decided to try to entice folks to follow us on twitter, and we used people’s love for trees to dupe convince them to follow us as we gave $$ to charity. Fast forward to the summer of 2012 when I decided to set up a new VerySpatial Facebook page (in addition to the already existing VerySpatial Friends group). I did this to allow for direct links to the podcasts from the FB page and to add one more place for me to visit at least occasionally. The downside is that with only a handful of page likes I feel that the FB page needs more attention (look at us, look at us).

I have decided (and I forced others to agree with me) that we will once again pull on folks heartstrings and their love trees, this time in exchange for Facebook Likes. I have dubbed this venture (sadly enough) Like4Trees*.

SO…for each person that Likes the new VerySpatial Facebook Page by Tuesday, 24 July (around our 7th Anniversary podcast) we will donate $1 to a tree related charity (no points for joining the Group, but why not make it a two-fer). Of course we are on a budget so we have a limit of $250, though hopefully that will not limit the number of followers.+

Last time, for Tweet4Trees, we made our donation to American Forests though we have not finalized who we will be giving to this time around so share your favorite environmental charities in the comments or on the Facebook page or in a tweet (@veryspatial) or in an email or in a boat or in a candygram (cupcakegram? Is that a thing? That should SO be a thing!!!)

If anyone is interested in matching our donations or making their own, let me know and we will give you special recognition on the podcast and blog.

We will provide the results of the Like4Trees drive during our show at the Esri UC in San Diego which will go up as Episode 367 on July 29, and of course on the blog.

*no imagination muscles were strained in the creation of this moniker
+if more than 250 folks like us and we have $$ left in the budget at the end of the year we will give more, though if previous years are an indication this isn’t likely


Written by

Jesse is Instructor in Geography and a PhD candidate in Geography focusing on the integration of phenomenology and geospatial technologies to study prehistoric cultural landscape. He is a GIS Professional and Registered Professional Archaeologist and holds an MA in Geography and a BS in Anthropology with a concentration in archaeology.