Remote Sensing

First student-built satellite to launch on Thursday

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The SSETI Express, a satellite designed and built by 100 students from 10 universities in Europe will launch from Russia on Thursday. The satellite is equipped with a camera that will take images of the Earth. Although the satellite is mainly a demonstration, the European Space Agency, which funded the project, sees this launch as the first step for the Student Space Exploration and Technology Initiative (SSETI) which will train European students in space science and remote sensing.

Another satellite that is launching with the SSETI Express is China’s Beijing-1 microsatellite, which is carrying the China Mapping Telescope. Its mission is to provide high-resolution imagery for mapping Chinese territory.

Via BBCNews

GeographyBlogs

Planet Geospatial

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I just realized that we have not actually blogged James Fee’s Planet Geospatial. We mentioned it on the podcast, thought we had here…I was wrong. So…

Planet Geospatial is a web based RSS aggregator that pulls together all of the geospatial technology related blogs that James has uncovered (he offers up his OPML file for those of you using a software aggregator). This page acts as a great one stop for a variety of information sources.

Planet Geospatial

General

BBC NEWS | Menu prices track fishing impact

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Not exactly spatial in the way the conducted it, but it is easy to see how it could be a significant variable in their work. The Census of Marine Life (COML) looked at over a 100 years of prices of seafood to infer impacts such as over harvesting of marine species. A great use of the historical record in an outside the box scenario. The detailed press release is available as a pdf from the COML website

BBC NEWS | Science/Nature | Menu prices track fishing impact

Cartography

Original Map of Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is Missing

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On Friday, an article at NY Times Online reported that the original map delineating the legal boundaries of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge has been missing since early 2003. And, to make matters worse, there are no known copies, no digitized GIS data, no scanned image, nothing. The USGS made a new map, but it apparently differs significantly from the original. The last person known to have seen the map was quoted as saying he did not believe the map was stolen, but only a few people knew where the map was stored. In any event, the new map has already been used as part of a measure to open the ANWR to drilling.

(Also blogged over at The Map Room and GeoCarta)