Groups

SkyTruth

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Tim Warner mentioned this non-profit organization on this weeks episode and it looks quite exciting. In their own words, “SkyTruth promotes environmental awareness and protection with remote sensing and digital mapping technology.” They support environmental advocates, local planners and others through their remote sensing activities and have been doing so since 2002.

To learn more and to support their efforts check out their website at:

SKYTRUTH: using remote sensing and digital mapping to educate the public and policymakers about the environmental consequences of human activities

Human Geography

Landscape Epidemiology and geospatial technologies

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Understanding how diseases spread is not a new discipline of study, but with increased concerns about the effects of our global world on the spread of dangerous viruses like SARS, AIDS, and yes, bird flu, I thought it would be timely to mention yet another use of GIS, Remote Sensing, and other geospatial technologies: landscape epidemiology. As a discipline, it dates back to the 1960s, when the notion that understanding the landscape and environment in areas where certain diseases develop or are particularly dangerous could help in predicting where diseases will spread and how severe outbreaks will be. Satellite imagery and GIS are being used successfully in landscape epidemiology studies, and a number of examples can be found on the Web, including a GIS project mapping SARS featured at GISUser.com

Other examples include projects studying West Nile Virus and this 2003 project to study Ebola

The ZevRoss website has a nice overview article here

Events

Beyond Einstein Live Webcast

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Although it’s not strictly geography, this is still pretty cool. A 12-hour live global webcast will be going on today to celebrate the 100th anniversary of Einstein’s theory of relativity, a revolutionary idea no matter what your area of expertise. I have been having trouble with the video myself, but the audio seems OK.

It began at 6:00am EST in the US (3:00am PST) and will run for 12 hours live.

Even if you aren’t that interested in physics, it’s still a nice tribute to Einsein.

Via BBCNews