Episode 20 now available for direct download

Posted on Posted in General

My apologies, I misspelled Episode 20 as ‘eposide’ in the file name generating a 404-file not found error. It is fixed on the site now and shouldn’t have impacted anything other than the direct download from the site…though it will still be Eposide20 🙂

BT Trackit

Posted on Posted in Navigation

British Telecomm wants to make sure your car doesn’t drive away without you…if you live in the UK. To this end they offer the BT Trackit system which, once installed, checks for a signal from an emitter you carry on you. If you and your signal are present, off you go. If your signal is absent then the location of your car is sent to the authorities and you are contacted with the lovely news that your car has wandered off without you.

BT Trackit

Via Engadget

SkyTruth

Posted on Posted in Groups, Remote Sensing

Tim Warner mentioned this non-profit organization on this weeks episode and it looks quite exciting. In their own words, “SkyTruth promotes environmental awareness and protection with remote sensing and digital mapping technology.” They support environmental advocates, local planners and others through their remote sensing activities and have been doing so since 2002.

To learn more and to support their efforts check out their website at:

SKYTRUTH: using remote sensing and digital mapping to educate the public and policymakers about the environmental consequences of human activities

GIS and the “Google Phenomenon” – from Directions Magazine

Posted on Posted in WebMapping

A recent editorial by Joe Francica at Directions Magazine discusses the impact of the “Google Phenomenon” on the geospatial software industry, and offers some interesting perspectives on how Google Maps and its competitors are already changing the business landscape and how traditional GIS and geospatial vendors must find a way to win the “struggle for relevance.”

Landscape Epidemiology and geospatial technologies

Posted on 1 CommentPosted in Human Geography

Understanding how diseases spread is not a new discipline of study, but with increased concerns about the effects of our global world on the spread of dangerous viruses like SARS, AIDS, and yes, bird flu, I thought it would be timely to mention yet another use of GIS, Remote Sensing, and other geospatial technologies: landscape epidemiology. As a discipline, it dates back to the 1960s, when the notion that understanding the landscape and environment in areas where certain diseases develop or are particularly dangerous could help in predicting where diseases will spread and how severe outbreaks will be. Satellite imagery and GIS are being used successfully in landscape epidemiology studies, and a number of examples can be found on the Web, including a GIS project mapping SARS featured at GISUser.com

Other examples include projects studying West Nile Virus and this 2003 project to study Ebola

The ZevRoss website has a nice overview article here