NASA, Big Data, and a Real World Jigsaw Puzzle

Posted on Posted in Cartography, Environmental, Remote Sensing, Software

NASA has posted two news items that illustrate the large amounts of data that they are generating. NASA| The Data Downpour is a  video describing how the GPM constellation turns observed radiances and reflectivities of global precipitation – falling snow and rain – into data products.  They detail this huge task in “GPM Mission’s How-to Guide for Making Global Rain Maps“. NASA’s Goddard Space Flight CenterPrecipitation Processing System (Greenbelt, Maryland)  is tasked with compiling remote sensing data from NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency.  The  data set will eventually become one unified global data set.  A simplified version of a very exacting process, as any geospatial professional will tell you. (more…)

Geospatial Professionals, Law, and Law School

Posted on Posted in Education, general, Political Geography

Geospatial technology is changing the legal environment in several distinct ways that have made the news recently. The first is the relatively new legal speciality of Spatial Law. According to GeoLaw, a Virginia law firm specializing in geospatial legal issues or Spatial Law, the rapid growth of geospatial technology has created the need for specialized knowledge of location based privacy, intellectual property rights in geospatial datasets, liability over spatial data, geo regulations, and national or other security issues.  GeoLaw maintains a Spatial Law and Policy Blog on Legal and Policy Issues associated with geospatial data and technology. It is the blog that you are directed to from The Centre For Spatial Law and Policy  which educates lawyers, businesses, government agencies, policy makers and others on the unique legal and policy issues associated with geospatial technology. Batchgeo maintains a map of top spatial law and policy stories around the world that the public or geospatial professionals can contribute, while it isn’t extensive it has current news for 2014. (more…)

Of place and space – the VerySpatial book club

Posted on Posted in avsp

unruly placesAs we have mentioned on the podcast a couple of times, we are kicking off a book club to focus on Geography themed books. We will focus on popular and trending books with an eye towards texts that are current and less expensive (under $20). We are using Goodreads’ group functionality to host the book club. We encourage you to go over and check out the group and join us.

Our first book is Alastair Bonnett’s Unruly Places: Lost Spaces, Secret Cities, and Other Inscrutable Geographies, which will be discussing through September. As this is part of VerySpatial you probably expect that we hope to have a conversation with each of the authors on the podcast. Our talk with Dr Bonnett and future authors will come out mid-month to give us time to chat about the book before and after the podcast. You can get sense of the book by listening to Dr Bonnett’s NPR interview from July.

We are already searching for future books, so let us know if you have any suggestions. If you are an author or a publisher, please let us know about your book so we can put on our list of potential reads. One thing we plan to do as we get a clear schedule (both for the discussions and future books) is to give away a few copies of the book we choose. To that end, keep an eye on the VerySpatial Twitter account later this week as we give away a couple of ebook versions of this month’s read.

Participate in a cartographic art project: Tweeting the NYCTA Graphics Standards

Posted on Posted in Cartography, Education, Human Geography

Massimo Vignelli continues to inspire cartographers, graphic designers, and artists with his New York City Transit Authority map standards. Artists, Niko Skourtis, Jesse Reed, and Hamish Smyth found a first edition Graphic Standard Manual designed by Vignelli in a locker beneath some old gym clothes.  According to an article in designTAXI, “Massimo Vignelli’s NYCTA Graphics Standards Manual Tweeted Page-By-Page“, the “The Standards Manual” project started on August 11 asks people to share the Standards Manual on Twitter, Facebook, and Pinterest.

It sounds like fun project and inspires its own question, “What other cartographic and geospatial manuals are gathering dust in old offices and on bookshelves that are worthy of being tweeted page-by-page?” standardsmanual