“One Planet, Many People” – New Atlas using Landsat imagery

The United Nations Environment Programme recently published One Planet, Many People: Atlas of Our Changing Environment, using 30 years of before-and-after Landsat images for 80 sites around the world to provide “insights into the many ways people around the world have changed, and continue to change, the environment.”
It is hardcover, and looks really nice, but at $150 US and $20 US to ship to Europe, $30 US elsewhere, I don’t think I can afford it. Still, it would be a great addition to many libraries.

Via Landsat Project website

Addition:  As pointed out by the CCA blog the chapters are actually available for download from the book’s homepage on the UNEP website.

Landsat 5 has resumed operations

Tim Warner here at WVU just forwarded us the good news that Landsat 5 has resumed acquisition operations for the continental US and international data acquisition will be coming back online in the next few weeks. Engineers were able to make adjustments to Landsat 5’s solar array to give it enough power to continue its mission. This is definitely good news for the remote sensing community.

The press release is available at the Landsat Mission website

States wary of Google’s Bird’s Eye View

Although this has been blogged in one form or the other several times over the last few months, I think it’s an increasingly pressing issue. States are having real problems about what they can see on Google Earth. This really gets to the heart of the whole public/private debate. As the article points out, Google isn’t putting out there anything that isn’t available from other places in other forms. It also reminds the GIS folks that sometimes completely innocent intentions can be feared.

The New York Times article

Via Digg

The Gigapxl Project

The Gigapxl Project is based on an amazing super-high resolution camera built by Graham Flint, which he has used to take amazing landscape pictures, including a panorama of Pittsburgh, which is not too far from us. One of the Project’s main goals is the Portrait of America, where the team travelled all across the US and parts of Canada. The Image Gallery has some nice examples of Gigapxl photographs.

Popular Science’s website has a great article about Graham Flint and Gigapxl, and the last page of the article also includes some interesting comments from Michael Jones, co-founder of Keyhole (now Google Earth) and his involvement as a supporter of the project.