ESRI – Hurricane Disaster Viewer

ESRI is serving an ArcWeb Services powered Hurricane Disaster viewer on its website. It offers a number of data layers from before the hurricanes, such as population density and imagery, and several layers related to post-hurricane conditions. There’s even a layer showing the US Postal Services closed service areas. Nothing earth-shattering, but pulls together GIS layers to go with imagery.

You can check out the Hurricane Disaster Viewer
here

CNET Review of Microsoft’s Virtual Earth beta

CNET posted their review of MSN Virtual Earth beta, which you can read here

Their review of Google Earth beta back in July can be found here

CNET gives Virtual Earth a plus for its trip planning and search features, but gives the edge to Google Earth in terms of the quality of satellite imagery features and coverage. Their concluding remark: “Travelers looking for local maps, driving routes, and businesses will like Virtual Earth, but students and casual browsers will prefer Google Earth.”

Day and Night around the World

If you simply must know where it is day and night around the world, here are a couple of websites for you.

time.gov keeps the official U.S. time via atomic clock and has a feature which shows where the sun is shining and where it is dark when you click on a time zone. Check it out here

The second website, by John Walker (founder of AutoDesk), offers the Earth and Moon Viewer, which has the day and night feature, as well as views of the earth from the moon, and the day and night sides using satellite imagery. It is much more of a webmapping interface, with query boxes to change the view and type of imagery.

Check out the Earth and Moon Viewer here

NAVTEQ launches its Annual Global LBS Challenge

This competition challenges application developers worldwide to build innovative positioning technology and NAVTEQ maps. Global registration is now open and will close December 2, 2005.

The first prize is $50,000 cash and $100,000 in NAVTEQ map licenses

You can read about the contest at GISuser.com

or at the Challenge website here

via GISuser.com

The start of Google Maps Messages?

Data is data. Sure Google gives folks a great interface to view it, but aerial and sattelite images have been captured for decades. Archaeologists have found archaeological sites via aeiral photos since the 1960s, Roman Villas and all. Folks aware of remote sensing have been leaving things to be seen in images, for good and bad, for almost as long as RS has been around…ok rant complete. The start of Google Maps Messages?

Oddens’ Bookmarks

If you want to know where to find anything about maps and mapping on the Internet, check out Odden’s Bookmarks. It’s a mapping-related links site maintained by the University of Utrecht Faculty of Geosciences that has a handy search function.

Link to it here