Original Map of Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is Missing

On Friday, an article at NY Times Online reported that the original map delineating the legal boundaries of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge has been missing since early 2003. And, to make matters worse, there are no known copies, no digitized GIS data, no scanned image, nothing. The USGS made a new map, but it apparently differs significantly from the original. The last person known to have seen the map was quoted as saying he did not believe the map was stolen, but only a few people knew where the map was stored. In any event, the new map has already been used as part of a measure to open the ANWR to drilling.

(Also blogged over at The Map Room and GeoCarta)

HOPEWORKS ‘N CAMDEN – Expanding the Futures of Youth

John Krygier pointed us to Hopeworks, a program in Camden, NJ whose mission includes reducing the dropout rate and to create hope for the future. They attempt to do this by engaging students through web and GIS services. The site is impressive and the concept is great.

They also have a position open for their GIS Director, a great GIS and society position for those interested.

HOPEWORKS ‘N CAMDEN – Expanding the Futures of Youth

Anyone going to ASA-CSSA-SSSA in SLC

I will be heading to the Agronomy/Soils/Crop conference in Salt Lake City in a couple of weeks (which means we won’t be going to Applied Geography). I will be putting up posters while I am there, but if anyone is going to be at the conference, or just live in SLC, a meetup could be arranged. Email me if you are interested, if we put something together then I will post the info by Nov 5 and mention it in podcast 16.

ASA-CSSA-SSSA

A different kind of “map”

While not really spatial, I thought Music Plasma was an interesing application for graphically showing relationships for data points. In this case, they’re pulling data from Amazon’s databases to show how certain bands “relate” to other bands, at least as far as Amazon’s customer habits are concerned. It’s interesting to remember that relationships beyond spatial ones can be shown using some of the more abstract concepts we see everyday in maps. Plus you can find really cool music you never heard of by starting with your favorite bands. That’s always cool.

Space Elevator Games

This weekend, NASA is offering its first Centennial Challenge, with $100,000 up for grabs. Ten teams will compete at NASA’s Ames Research Center in California in events related to space elevator development, including the Beam Power Challenge and the Tether Challenge.

Via MSNBC.com

Latest on the Internet control dispute

A resolution has been introduced in the US Senate to back the Bush administration’s efforts to stop the UN from taking some of the control of the Internet away from the US. It basically says that the Senate will support the US efforts in the negotiations in Tunisia, but at least they are aware of the importance of this issue. In this article from ZDNet UK, a couple of points were brought up that I didn’t even know: there have suggestions made that taxes be levied on domain names to pay for “universal access” and since 1999 UN agencies have thought about taxing Internet email. I know that people from other countries may not think that US control of the Internet is best, but given the current alternatives, the status quo seems like the best option.

Via Digg.com

Mapping the Universe

If you think it’s ambitious to map the entire earth, check out the Sloan Digital Sky Survey According to their website: “the Sloan Digital Sky Survey is the most ambitious astronomical survey project ever undertaken. The survey will map in detail one-quarter of the entire sky, determining the positions and absolute brightnesses of more than 100 million celestial objects. It will also measure the distances to more than a million galaxies and quasars.”

They have already made quite a lot of progress, and their SkyServer offers all kinds of images and other data, and other cool tools for just exploring their data or for school and research projects

GITA on workforce readiness grant

Glenn over at GISUser spoke with Bob Samborski, Executive President of GITA, on the DOL funding workforce readiness. Mr Samborski outlined 5 key steps for conducting this study.

“1. Getting a grip on understanding geospatial and defining it
2. Communication and public outreach – this approach will serve to identify what kinds of skills are needed for professionals. A number of partners will be used to help secure feedback and communication.
3. Development of a web-based portal to access curricula information. This will also serve to help explain and communicate to academia what they need to be teaching to better prepare students for careers in geospatial technologies.
4. Use the portal as a live test site. This will involve a live pilot project with a goal of replicating the effort based on the outcome.
5. Making the project results sustainable.”

For more information head over and read the full article at GISuser.com