GAW Day 2: Human Geography

Although definitions vary, most agree that human geography focuses on the interactions between humans and their environment, and the spatial relationships that define and are defined by those interactions. Human geography has many sub-disciplines, from cultural geography to urban geography to historical geography and many others (Wikipedia lists 18 fields of Human Geography, and that’s not even all of them).
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GAW Day 1: Physical Geography

As I have mentioned before, I see Geography as a series of relationships and as we look back through the history of Geography we see three main areas that we can use as umbrellas for the broad aspects of Geography: cartography, human geography and physical geography. Physical Geography covers the relationships within the environment around us, a broad area to be sure, but an important one in our daily lives.
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Welcome to Geography Awareness Week at VerySpatial

This week we will be taking a look at five broad areas within Geography, beginning today with Physical Geography with the rest of the week as:

Tuesday – Human Geography
Wednesday – GIS Day complete with podcast
Thursday – Cartography
Friday – A round-up of the myriad of topics that we won’t be covering

We will have the first up later today.

avsp drawing/contest #1

As we have mentioned in the podcasts and show notes, we are hosting our first give away. We will be conducting a drawing on December 2, 2005 of post cards that you send in. Send us a post card, preferably one that shows your area of the world, with your contact information, especially email, to:

VerySpatial
PO Box 1026
Morgantown, WV 26507

All entries must be received by December 1, 2005 to be eligible. We will be giving away SWAG from the VerySpatial store. Winners will be announced on Episode 20 of the podcast on December 4, 2005.

ASA-CSSA-SSSA Day 3

This morning I sat in on THE session for geographers, it was on geospatial technologies and landscapes. A farily good session from my perspective. Today’s posters are fairly good as well…even included a few archaeological uses of soil (all from BYU). This afternoon was a little more quiet as I meandered through sessions, though nothing exciting. I had hoped to bump into a colleague that I like to harrass when I see her (she decided not to come to WVU when she was offered a position) but only her posters could be found, no sign of her. I fly out far too early in the morning and of course lose 2 hours going back east…weep for me 🙂

ASA-CSSA-SSSA Day 2

Ummm…yeah. So today, I skipped the morning, but sat in on a session in the afternoon on erosion and runoff (under the soil physics section – S01). I have only recorded on interview so far and it doesn’t sound great. We were standing in front of a poster (use of handheld hyperspectral sensors in recording soils information in a profile) in a room that was quite busy, 2 people talking right next to us, and, most importantly, recorded with the iPod. I will try to clean it up, but I will try to corner people in quieter areas. Another poster presenter I wanted interview was presenting on soil in subacqueous landscape, but I didn’t want to seem like a stalker.

Today’s posters were a little more interesting to me, plenty of geography, especially geostats, most of which were out of Florida, Sabine Grunwald’s lab I would guess since she was second author on a few. Tomorrow there is a session on geospatial tech and soils that will be attending. Til then.

ASA-CSSA-SSSA Day 1

I am skipping out on sessions right now, but I will head back in a few. Salt Lake City is still a nice town (I was here in March for the NRCS cultural resource specialists meeting). The conference seems a little smaller than I expected since it is three groups at one conference. I am use to the 4000 or more people wandering around at the Society for American Archaeology and Association of American Geographers conferences.

Also, there are a lot of posters, in fact it seems to be a 1:1 ratio between presenters and posters (I might do the math later if I get bored enough).