GAW Day 4: Cartography

So far this week we have talked about the main areas of consideration in Geography (physical and human) and the modern technologies that underpin them (GIS Day). Today we look at perhaps the oldest portion of geography, cartography. While not all cartographers are geographers, nor are all geographers cartographers, there is a deep symbiotic relationship that exists. Cartography has existed in some form since the beginning of what we know as human civilization, from the earliest abstract interpretations of space to modern near-real maps and data. Continue reading “GAW Day 4: Cartography”

CartoTalk

After our podcast episode on cartography, John Krygier emailed us, and mentioned that CartoTalk might be a good resource for people interested in cartography and map design. It is a forum with over 250 members and topics include news, general discussions, a map gallery, and advice and tutorials.

Registrations is free, so if you’re interested in cartography, check it out.

USGS Mapping Center Move On Hold

The plan to close the USGS mapping center in Rolla, Missouri and move its operations to Denver has been put on hold after Missouri officials and legislators protested, and the decision will now be reviewed before any further action is taken

Via Geoplace

Original Map of Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is Missing

On Friday, an article at NY Times Online reported that the original map delineating the legal boundaries of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge has been missing since early 2003. And, to make matters worse, there are no known copies, no digitized GIS data, no scanned image, nothing. The USGS made a new map, but it apparently differs significantly from the original. The last person known to have seen the map was quoted as saying he did not believe the map was stolen, but only a few people knew where the map was stored. In any event, the new map has already been used as part of a measure to open the ANWR to drilling.

(Also blogged over at The Map Room and GeoCarta)

Green Map System

According to their website, ” The Green Map System (GMS) is a locally adaptable, globally shared framework for environmental mapmaking.”

Basically, it’s a collaborative worldwide project that is collecting Green Map projects together on one website and also offers tips and examples on using Green Maps in local community planning and education. They’ve already got an impressive list of projects from around the world (though many are still in progress or just started)

If you are interested in environmental issues and how geospatial technologies can be used, check out Greenmap.com