Why you should clearly mark your geocache!

This story on CNN demostrates why you need to clearly mark a geocache as such. From the article, “In June, a bomb squad in De Pere, Wisconsin, used a robot-mounted shotgun to blast the lid off a suspicious-looking military ammunition box found in a park. It also turned out to be a geocache.” It’s a little bit funny, but also a tad scary. So paint a big red ‘geocache’ on your geocache boxes!

Via Digg

IP Address to Location

The Link has been corrected now!  Sorry for any confusion. 

While there are a few tools out there to do this sort of thing, I thought this one was a nice, clean, simple interface for it. It features AJAX (Asynchronous Javascript and XML) as its base technology, which helps make it faster than most implementations. It’s a pretty usefull tool for those interested in doing IP lookups to find geographic coordinates.

Do Geographers Need More Sleep?

Here’s an interesting article about the effects of sleep deprivation. The interesting note is that sleep deprivation appears to most aversely affect spatial learning and spatial tasks! So if you’re having trouble with any of your GIS projects, maybe you need more sleep….?

The full article.

Sometimes you just gotta get out and drive it…

Here’s an interesting article in Wired about keeping all of these online GIS databases fresh. As they point out, sometimes you just have to send someone out to drive the route and see what’s out there. Electronic methods are great but they only take you so far.

I think the most interesting quote is on the first page: “our version of finding a brave new world. We’ll drive it until it connects to some point (already) in the database.”

Via Wired

States wary of Google’s Bird’s Eye View

Although this has been blogged in one form or the other several times over the last few months, I think it’s an increasingly pressing issue. States are having real problems about what they can see on Google Earth. This really gets to the heart of the whole public/private debate. As the article points out, Google isn’t putting out there anything that isn’t available from other places in other forms. It also reminds the GIS folks that sometimes completely innocent intentions can be feared.

The New York Times article

Via Digg

TrafficView Project

The University of Maryland has an interesting concept for traffic monitoring and mapping – peer-to-peer traffic monitoring! The idea is that cars will be equpied with devices which can communicate with nearby cars to report traffic conditions and the like. It’s an interesting use of peer-to-peer technologies and potentially GIS.

TrafficView. Read the PDF for the most in depth information.

Sony’s DRM Damage Mapped

Sony stepped into all sorts of trouble with thier copy protection scheme on CDs. Although they claim the damage is minimal, the folks over at Doxpara Research claim otherwise. Since Sony’s scheme calls home, the Doxpara folks figured there would an entry in DNS servers around the world showing the call home. Doing an analysis, they’ve identified 568,200 nameservers have been witnessed a phone back home to Sony’s servers.

The interesting part about this is that mapped it! There’s also a Europe and Japan. The site specifies how they mapped the data.

GIS turns up in all sorts of interesting places!

A different kind of “map”

While not really spatial, I thought Music Plasma was an interesing application for graphically showing relationships for data points. In this case, they’re pulling data from Amazon’s databases to show how certain bands “relate” to other bands, at least as far as Amazon’s customer habits are concerned. It’s interesting to remember that relationships beyond spatial ones can be shown using some of the more abstract concepts we see everyday in maps. Plus you can find really cool music you never heard of by starting with your favorite bands. That’s always cool.