Geography Themed Weddings

I love Crafster. It’s a great place to get ideas and see how creative people can be. It’s amazing how much geography can inexpensively personalize a wedding. I liked this 100% DIY Punk Rock Wedding everything in it is cool but especially how they used local street names to label the tables. Several people used travel maps to make cards or save the date invitations incorporating the directions into the design. There is even a naughty bachelor party in a globe. Of course these ideas could be used for anything (except perhaps the bachelor party in a globe) but it just shows how much incorporating geography into gifts and planning could help cut down on the costs for things. I even saw on a another site someone had used social networking and maps as ice-breakers on tables to connect people at a table to each other which helps with the… why did they sit me here hierarchy.

Crazy number

OK, I was just looking at our podcast download numbers for the first time in a while and I was FLOORED by the fact that 21,866 episodes were downloaded in October alone. Now admittedly that is from 561 files covering the weekly mp3 and aac versions, special episodes, and videos (though admittedly mostly the weekly shows), but that is just breath taking on our end. We are ecstatic that you guys are downloading each week and that you like us, or at least are mildly amused by us 🙂

Thanks again for visiting, listening and watching. We have some plans for the new year in terms of the site design and the podcasts, including a live show from both the AAG and ESRI UC, so stay tuned.

A Loo with a View

Plenty of places are talking about the new picture book A Loo with a View by Luke Barclay which features the world’s tops toilet views. What I find most interesting is that 1) He was able to do it in under two years, 2) He’s looking for submissions from other people, 3)he has a history background. I think I was expecting him to be a geography major!

Note: sorry, Barb posted this about a month ago, but it got stuck in the drafts somehow…

Thanksgiving strikes again!

turkeyI knew it! You ate too much turkey (gobbler or tofu) with dressing and ALL of the fixings didn’t you. Now you are sitting there contemplating your navel…which seems much closer than is was before you ate as the triptophan begins to kick in and your head tilts forward as you start to fall asleeeee…..huh? What? Oh yeah I was wriing. SO! Take this moment to think of what you are thankful for in your life and share it with someone, ’cause what is the point of keeping it bottled up. If you are on Twitter (and who isn’t) share your Tweetsgiving wishes (check it out even you aren’t on Twitter). If you want to share it with us, feel free to leave comment here, leave us a voice mail on our phone line or skype account or just yell your Thanksgiving wishes really loud out the window…we might hear it, you never know.

We hope that everyone has a Happy Thanksgiving! even if you aren’t in the US. 🙂

The Landscape Studies Podcast

As you are ALL very interested in finding new spatially relevant podcast I wanted to point out one that I recently came across the The Landscape Studies Podcast. This is a video podcast that looks at Landscape Studies from a position that sits outside of most of our discussion of space and place and instead looks at the landscape as a container of sorts. Now that of course is the way that we also use in our spatial perspective of the world, but this podcast (so far) has taken a more interdisciplinary perspective. All for the good I say, and I am interested to see how their self proclaimed social experiment to engage those inside and outside of the arena of landscape studies in a dialectic goes.

MeetWays – Find a place to meet in town

While MeetWays might focus on finding a point of interest between two addresses to help people meet halfway, at this time of year it could offer more. Many of us who are traveling this holiday season will need to stop a few times and MeetWays might be able to help you find a good place. Keep in mind it is much better at looking at smaller areas rather than cross country trips. The interface is fairly straight forward, you enter your origin and destination along with the type of place you want to stop at (e.g. Pizza, Coffee, Bank).

While it is good for finding locations on short or straight path trips, it doesn’t help those of us who follow interstates since it finds the physical halfway point, not the midpoint of a route. My example is that I travel between Morgantown, WV and Kinston, NC. The halfway point for my trip is near Appomatox, VA, and while they offer some great options in the area for my search term of ‘tacos’ these establishments would take me hours out of my way. On the other hand, a search between Morgantown and Clarksburgh, WV for gas, a fairly short and straight trip, gave me good options. Keep in mind that the roads I travel go through mountains and that those of you in flat areas may have better results than I did and that if you break your trip up into shorter segments you may do better.

Checking out Google Earth in the CAVE

Our GIS Day Open House at Brooks Hall on the WVU Campus gave the public a chance to come in and try out our CAVE installation. It was a hit, and we had lots of people come by, including students, faculty from other departments at the university, and several staff members from a local engineering firm. One of the most popular features for visitors was the CAVE’s Conduit for Google Earth, which allows us to display Google Earth in stereo in the immersive environment. We explored a couple of 3D cities and even the new Ancient Rome project that was recently added and looks really cool.

Here is one of the photos I snapped during the Open House (The offset double images you see on the CAVE walls are for the stereo effect)