You know…172

I have just finished editing this week’s episode a bit early due to Sue and I hitting the Digital Humanities and Computer Science Colloquium at the University of Chicago this weekend. During my time editing the main topic (on NeoGeo and academia) I noticed that I said ‘you know” WAY too many times and I just wanted to say I will be cutting back on my use of that particular phrase (yes, I said it THAT many times). I think this is one of our better topics in a while content wise, but I was apparently a little too laid back last weekend when we recorded it 🙂

Links update

I am a bit behind on updating the links page, but I have just added three new blogs/sites to the list:

  • GIS at Vassar – highlights GIS activities going on at Vassar College in New York
  • For Many Intents & Purposes – is a blog by one of ‘neighbors’ up in Frostburg MD that talks about ‘GIS, Computers, and Programming’ with a dash of birding tossed in
  • Central Area 4-H Tech Team – is a site of one of the 4-H programs that is doing GIS in their community (over in Iowa). They also recently received one of ESRI’s GIS Mapping grant. It is always great to see the roving mass of 4-H’ers at the EdUC every year.
  • If you would like us to add a link to your Geography blog or site, please send us an email. It will find its way to the list eventually!

    Corn Mazes – Fun for all!

    Even though it’s a little late in the season, I couldn’t resist posting about a fun harvest time adventure for all ages – corn mazes! You can find people making them in lots of places where corn is grown (or maize for some of our readers), and of course they are often combined with those other fun down-on-the-farm activities like hay rides. Sadly, although I grew up in a corn-growing area and tromped through many cornfields, none of them were laid out into cool mazes.

    Of course, for those of you who don’t want to miss out like I did, there are many resources on the Interwebs where you can find maps and directories of corn mazes, like Corn Mazes America or Corn Maze Directory, the USGS has a webpage on teaching Geography using corn mazes, and a site called Harvest Moon even has a virtual corn maze for people who’d rather not go outside at all.

    New Poll – Candy

    Our new poll will be a short run, but I feel it asks an important question…”What is your favorite Halloween themed candy?” The options are a short list of some to great options and includes: Chocolate, Caramel, Hard Candy, Candy Corn, and Bubble Gum.

    Our outgoing poll had a tie between the folks heading to SEDAAG and the Rocky Mountain/Great Plains division meetings. The surprising part was how few people responded to the question, which I interpret to mean that most of you do not attend the regional AAG meetings. This does line-up with my experience at these meetings since overall attendance is definitely not proportional to the annual AAG meeting based on the area of each division.

    The Candy Map Manifesto

    We declare that it is the right of all peoples to acquire and consume as much sugar as is humanly possible in any form imaginable. As the veil begins to thin and we honor our ancestors as is the tradition on October 31 and November 1, it is imperative that spirits are high. In order to ensure maximum intake of the appropriate confectionery delights (aka all of them) I would propose a candy map. The map’s purpose would be to share knowledge of availability, location, and type of candy that is available. With the change of trick-or-treating from an all out assault on sweets to a careful maneuvering of connections and relations that ends in an ever decreasing amount of candy corn and marzipan fruits, the counter intuitive reversal of acquisition of all that is candied needs to be opposed and fought.

    I propose that we band together to increase the potential of candy acquisition in 2009 through the use of geographic information and social networking (it’s a little late to start this year). I suggest that next year we combine the strengths of webmapping/mobile mapping and GeoRSS in order to create a realtime map of when different locals celebrate and locations with the best candy and possibly provide a way to vet locations to help parents find places they feel safe taking their children. Yeah, that is it. Maybe not ‘manifesto’ worthy, but I wanted to toss it out there. I will mention that candymap.org is available if anyone wants to get this started 🙂