VectorOne

I first came across Jeff Thurston’s blog when I was doing a search on geovisualization and found the domain. This was well before we started VerySpatial over the summer, and I was a bit bummed that someone had laid claim to the domain so I wandered off. Since then I have gone back a few times, included the blog in my aggregator, but I have never read more than 10 entries. Why you might ask? 1) This is a great blog and I want to read it from the beginning and 2) I am a bit intimidated :-). The majority of entries would make for great columns in a magazine.

So today I ripped the entire site to my hard drive (sorry about the extra hits today Jeff) and will be reading it from the beginning.

I recommend that you take a moment and check out Jeff’s blog and make sure to go through his archives to find any of a number of gems that offer insight into the geospatial community.

Vector One

Episode 20 now available for direct download

My apologies, I misspelled Episode 20 as ‘eposide’ in the file name generating a 404-file not found error. It is fixed on the site now and shouldn’t have impacted anything other than the direct download from the site…though it will still be Eposide20 🙂

BT Trackit

British Telecomm wants to make sure your car doesn’t drive away without you…if you live in the UK. To this end they offer the BT Trackit system which, once installed, checks for a signal from an emitter you carry on you. If you and your signal are present, off you go. If your signal is absent then the location of your car is sent to the authorities and you are contacted with the lovely news that your car has wandered off without you.

BT Trackit

Via Engadget

SkyTruth

Tim Warner mentioned this non-profit organization on this weeks episode and it looks quite exciting. In their own words, “SkyTruth promotes environmental awareness and protection with remote sensing and digital mapping technology.” They support environmental advocates, local planners and others through their remote sensing activities and have been doing so since 2002.

To learn more and to support their efforts check out their website at:

SKYTRUTH: using remote sensing and digital mapping to educate the public and policymakers about the environmental consequences of human activities